Tuesday, February 13, 2018

The Temagami Cottage Bigfoot Photos


Here's the story behind the famous cottage bigfoot photos. These photos have never been debunked, and are possibly the clearest photos of a real bigfoot ever taken. Check it out, and see if you believe the story behind them.

41 comments:

  1. Clearest photos??????????????

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  2. I seen one just like this exept it was out by barona. me & my pop pop was coming out after the buffet and seem him digging in the dumpster eating garbage i guess. Pop pop called him trash ape.and even yelled at him and that's when he run off and we seen hopw big and wide he was. much bigger than a standard bigfoot you hear about.

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    1. I've always likes these photos and they look real to me.Not blurry and not pareidolia xx

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    2. You and Ikdummy sure have a lot in common!

      1000% CLUELESS!!! YOU DON'T RESEARCH!

      Sure is funny how this pic is so easy to replicate, but yet no of you yo-yo's can replicate what i produce.

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    3. You can’t replicate pareidolia Bruce. And you just got your backside kicked on the Gimlim thread.

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    4. DS i could with ease replicate what you do but:
      1.I can't be bothered
      2.I can't tell lies
      3.Unlike you i don't have "too much time on my hands" and
      4.Unlike you i don't live in cloud cuckoo land xx

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    5. Here’s a tree person;

      https://ugc.kn3.net/i/origin/http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-pcAqlSRiSiU/UGnqgbR2RYI/AAAAAAAAG4U/Q0IvkpcDFik/s1600/pareidolia-arbol3.jpg

      ... Replicate it.

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    6. PIB, you may not have “too much time on your hands” to allow you to post comments here constantly, but your maniac friend ikdummy certainly does.

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    7. People have smart phones these days, Stuey. With the way you go through desktop monitors in frustration... I wouldn’t recommend you waste your money.

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    8. I heard that they now even allow patients in mental institutions to have smart phones — that would sure explain some things! Ha ha ha!

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    9. ^ "cottaging" is his fave hobby

      https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/cottaging

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    10. You see the thing is 12:17 DS told me i had too much time on my hands after i spent all of 5 mins googling a past comment he made even though he's had the time to take 7,000 photos of trees then upload them on his computer,draw faces on them and post them on Youtube and if that wasn't enough he still has the time to stalk Iktomi :) xx

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    11. Hey Stuey... In light of your repeatedly used extraordinary claim of a thousands years old, globe trotting, hoaxing conspiracy theory as a response for the scientific method... I came across this;

      “Psychologists state that those whose personalities tend to be authoritarian are more likely to believe in conspiracies. In need of a sense of control over events, conspiracies provide them with an explanation for those events over which they cannot exert control.”
      https://www.mentalhelp.net/blogs/paranoia-and-conspiracy-theories/

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    12. Why don’t you research information regarding psychological disorders suffered by pathetic people who appropriate native culture to support their online fantasy role playing existences? You appear to have plenty of free time.

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    13. Hmmmm... indeed. “Role players”. This of course ties in with your hoaxing conspiracy theory and desperate requirement for control, yes? Tell me, who has time to pretend to be two different people arguing with themselves for anything up to 12 hours straight?

      “Conspiracy theories, on the other hand, are tough to disprove. Their proponents can make the theories increasingly elaborate to accommodate new observations; and, ultimately, any information contradicting a conspiracy theory can be answered with, “Well sure, that’s what they want you to think.” Despite their unfalsifiable nature, conspiracy theories attract significant followings.”
      https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/insights-into-the-personalities-conspiracy-theorists/

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    14. This has been a bad week for Bruce/Stuey. They got roasted like peanuts and Bruce baby can't even come up with one name of an expert who endorses his rubbish. Typical lying scammer who does it for the trolling clicks on youtube !
      Retire Bruce/Stuey. These photo are clear AF , way better than the trash you claim to be your vaunted evidence

      Joe

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    15. Hmm, you don’t believe me? How about someone of whom you just recently declared: “His opinion is respected because knowledge commands respect.”

      According to Steven Str****fert:

      “I agree that the modern use of Native cultural elements is appropriation, and is not a really deep consideration of the uniqueness of the real Native cultures as they were or as they currently are.”

      “I don't think that a giant ogress, or a spirit being, or a shapeshifting entity that can take any form, or a myth of The Guardian of the Woods, or of wild tribes of humans who interacted with other tribes, can be bent and molded into the modern ‘Bigfoot.’If anything, they contradict the modern image.”

      http://www.internationalskeptics.com/forums/showthread.php?t=312102&page=4

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    16. You’re a racist piece of garbage who doesn’t give a damn about native culture except as it relates to your bigfoot role playing fantasy. You use natives like an old 1950’s John Wayne movie for your pathetic pretend online persona. People like you do the greatest harm to the cause of natives.

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    17. Yes... it didn’t debunk “Bigfoot” the first time around. And yes, his opinion is respected. Doesn’t mean I have to agree with him on everything.

      “This is exactly the question posed by British psychologist Karen Douglas and her colleagues in a recent article in the journal Current Directions in Psychological Science. The researchers found that reasons for believing in conspiracy theories can be grouped into three categories:
      • The desire for understanding and certainty
      • The desire for control and security
      • The desire to maintain a positive self-image”
      https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/talking-apes/201801/why-do-people-believe-in-conspiracy-theories

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    18. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    19. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    20. THE STICK INDIANS OF THE COLVILLES
      The Interaction of Large Bipedal Hominids with American Indians as reported to Dr. Ed Fusch, Anthropologist, 1992

      "This research study is centered on the Spokane and Colville Indian Reservations located in the north-central and northeast sectors of Washington State, from approximately 55 miles northwest of Spokane westward to the Okanogan River north of Wenatchee in north-central Washington State.

      At these sites the primary and most of the secondary research was conducted. The primary research consisted of direct personal interviews with tribal members. The secondary research involved archival studies of newspaper documents and historical literature of the tribe. Due to the time element and cost factor, tools such as questionnaires and interview schedules could not be used at this time, although I feel that such tools would provide a wealth of information if used in follow-up research at a future date."

      http://www.bigfootencounters.com/biology/fusch.htm

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    21. Appropriation
      əˌprəʊprɪˈeɪʃ(ə)n/Submit
      noun
      1. The action of appropriating something.
      "dishonest appropriation of property"

      I’m not sure how the above definition applies to anthropologists, actual scientists, studying native oral traditions? Maybe you can elaborate on your conspiracy theory to come up with something? I’ll be back in the morning to check on you.

      : p

      “People need to feel they’re in control of their lives. For instance, many people feel safer when they’re the driver in the car rather than a passenger. Of course, even the best drivers can get into accidents for reasons beyond their control. Likewise, conspiracy theories can give their believers a sense of control and security. This is especially true when the alternative account feels threatening.”
      https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/talking-apes/201801/why-do-people-believe-in-conspiracy-theories

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    22. MAYAK DATAT: THE HAIRY MAN PICTOGRAPHS
      Kathy Moskowitz Strain
      U.S. Forest Service, Stanislaus National Forest, 19777 Greenley Road, Sonora, CA 95370

      ABSTRACT. The purpose of this article is to examine the association of prehistoric pictographs with contemporary stories told by the Tule River Indians about Hairy Man. Located on the Tule River Indian Reservation, the Painted Rock Pictographs are approximately 1000 years old. According to members of the tribe, the pictographs depict how various animals, including Hairy Man, created People. Other stories tell why Hairy Man lives in the mountains, steals food, and still occupies parts of the reservation. Since the Tule River Indians equate Hairy Man to Bigfoot, the pictograph and stories are valuable to our understanding of the modern idea of a hair-covered giant.
      http://www2.isu.edu/rhi/pdf/Mayak%20Datat%20Hairy%20Man%20Pictographs-1.pdf

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    23. @1:25 I agree 100% fake Welsh man "ikpedo" constantly misrepesents the First nations to serve his sick fantasy...
      Total Creep!

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    24. Unfortunately for you, anthropologists would disagree.

      It’s ok... you have your coping mechanism for control, right?

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  3. Replies
    1. Oh careful, you’ll hurt my feelings.

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    2. just say no such thing as bigfoot and he'll cry like a little girl

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    3. No, I’ll simply require you to provide some substance to that extraordinary claim. Just because you’re a conspiracy nut, doesn’t mean anybody else is crying, Stuey.

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    4. ^ "cottager" ikky

      https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Cottaging

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    5. “Research has identified a number of personality traits and characteristics that are now known to be associated with belief in conspiracy theories such as paranoia, cynicism, mistrust, feelings of powerlessness, anxiety, and uncertainty.

      Some demographic factors are important too. For example, people with lower levels of education seem more susceptible to conspiracy theories, whereas those inclined to think more analytically are less likely to believe in them. Also, people who lie at the extremes in terms of their political orientation are more likely to endorse conspiracy theories.”
      http://sciencenordic.com/secrets-and-lies-psychology-conspiracy-theories

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    6. See, the JREF conspiracy girl crying like a baby

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    7. Owned like a JREFer in a Bigfoot Bookstore.

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    8. Yes watch out for JREF boogeyman Lucy

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    9. “In need of a sense of control over events, conspiracies provide them with an explanation for those events over which they cannot exert control.”

      Profound.

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    10. There's Lucy trying to exert control, projecting again Lucy^

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    11. Is that meant to offend me?
      Lucy

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  4. This cottage stuff is more hoaxed bigfoot BS.

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